Thesis On Kant

Tags: Justice Edward Koch ThesisWriting A Paper OutlineWar EssayMoney Can Buy Health EssayWays To Start A Narrative EssayHelp With Writing A Compare And Contrast EssayEnglish Writing Skills EssayEssay Writing On Effects Of Junk FoodRose Emily Essay QuestionsTaxi Cab Business Plan

In the end, one does not know what to think of the human race, so conceited in its gifts.

Since the philosopher cannot presuppose any [conscious] individual purpose among men in their great drama, there is no other expedient for him except to try to see if he can discover a natural purpose in this idiotic course of things human.

This point of time must be, at least as an ideal, the goal of man’s efforts, for otherwise his natural capacities would have to be counted as for the most part vain and aimless.

This would destroy all practical principles, and Nature, whose wisdom must serve as the fundamental principle in judging all her other offspring, would thereby make man alone a contemptible plaything.

Reason in a creature is a faculty of widening the rules and purposes of the use of all its powers far beyond natural instinct; it acknowledges no limits to its projects.

Reason itself does not work instinctively, but requires trial, practice, and instruction in order gradually to progress from one level of insight to another.In keeping with this purpose, it might be possible to have a history with a definite natural plan for creatures who have no plan of their own.We wish to see if we can succeed in finding a clue to such a history; we leave it to Nature to produce the man capable of composing it.By “antagonism” I mean the unsocial sociability of men, i.e., their propensity to enter into society, bound together with a mutual opposition which constantly threatens to break up the society.Man has an inclination to associate with others, because in society he feels himself to be more than man, i.e., as more than the developed form of his natural capacities.Whatever concept one may hold, from a metaphysical point of view, concerning the freedom of the will, certainly its appearances, which are human actions, like every other natural event are determined by universal laws.However obscure their causes, history, which is concerned with narrating these appearances, permits us to hope that if we attend to the play of freedom of the human will in the large, we may be able to discern a regular movement in it, and that what seems complex and chaotic in the single individual may be seen from the standpoint of the human race as a whole to be a steady and progressive though slow evolution of its original endowment.Therefore a single man would have to live excessively long in order to learn to make full use of all his natural capacities.Since Nature has set only a short period for his life, she needs a perhaps unreckonable series of generations, each of which passes its own enlightenment to its successor in order finally to bring the seeds of enlightenment to that degree of development in our race which is completely suitable to Nature’s purpose.Since the free will of man has obvious influence upon marriages, births, and deaths, they seem to be subject to no rule by which the number of them could be reckoned in advance.Yet the annual tables of them in the major countries prove that they occur according to laws as stable as [those of] the unstable weather, which we likewise cannot determine in advance, but which, in the large, maintain the growth of plants the flow of rivers, and other natural events in an unbroken uniform course.

SHOW COMMENTS

Comments Thesis On Kant

The Latest from www.it-informer.ru ©