Rear Window Essay Conclusion

Rear Window Essay Conclusion-78
Jeff’s exaggerated interpretations of his neighbours’ actions lead him to an irrational sense of suspicion, which is in many way the basis of the entire film.At the same time, the 1950s saw a boom in photojournalism as a legitimate profession.Conversely, divorce was highly frowned upon, and once you were married, you would in general remain married for the rest of your life.

Jeff’s exaggerated interpretations of his neighbours’ actions lead him to an irrational sense of suspicion, which is in many way the basis of the entire film.At the same time, the 1950s saw a boom in photojournalism as a legitimate profession.Conversely, divorce was highly frowned upon, and once you were married, you would in general remain married for the rest of your life.

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This explains the prevalence of cameras in his life, as well as his ability to emotionally distance himself from those whom he observes through the lens.

Another crucial historical element is the institution of marriage, and how important it was to people during the 1950s.

Lighting is one such cue that he uses a lot—it is said that at certain points in filming, he had used every single light owned by the studio in which this film was shot.

In this film, lighting is used to reveal things: when the lights are on in any given apartment, Jeff is able to peer inside and watch through the window (almost resembling a little TV screen; Jeff is also able to channel surf through the various apartments—Hitchcock uses panning to show this).

On the contrary, a lack of lighting is also used to hide things, and we see Thorwald utilise this at many stages in the film.

Jeff also takes advantage of this, as he often sits in a position where he is very close to being in the shadows himself; if he feels the need, he is able to retreat such that he is fully enshrouded.Possibly the central tenet of the film is the big question of privacy.Even in today’s society, the sanctity of privacy is an important concept; every individual has a right to make their own choices without having to disclose, explain or justify all of them.is usually studied in the Australian curriculum under Area of Study 1 - Text Response.For a detailed guide on Text Response, check out our Ultimate Guide to VCE Text Response. ‘Jeff’ Jeffries is portrayed by James Stewart, who was known at the time for portraying cowboys in various Western films as well as starring in an earlier Hitchcock film Despite some initial misgivings, his insurance nurse Stella (Thelma Ritter) and lover Lisa (Grace Kelly) also come to share his suspicions and participate in his spying.The film undoubtedly carries undertones of this, particularly in Jeff’s disregard for his neighbours’ privacy and his unparalleled ability to jump to conclusions about them.During this era, people really did fear one another, since the threat of Communism felt so widespread.Hitchcock ultimately resolves both of these storylines in the film’s denouement.Before getting into the nitty-gritty of the film, it is crucial to understand a bit about its historical context.Their contrasting lifestyles and world views present a major obstacle in the fulfilment of their romance, and the murder mystery both distracts and unites them.Hitchcock further alludes to the question of whether marriage will be able to settle those differences after all—a major example is the following scene, in which Lisa not only reveals her discovery of Mrs Thorwald’s ring, but also expresses a desire for Jeff to ‘put a ring on it’ as well: are important ways of shaping our understanding of the film, and Hitchcock uses a wide array of visual cues to communicate certain messages.

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