Booker T Washington Essays

Booker T Washington Essays-53
Though he was born a slave, he got a good education and found an important calling, and he helped other blacks improve their lives despite discriminatory laws.He believed that personal responsibility and a spirit of enterprise were crucial.He earned food money by helping to unload pig iron from a ship.

Though he was born a slave, he got a good education and found an important calling, and he helped other blacks improve their lives despite discriminatory laws.He believed that personal responsibility and a spirit of enterprise were crucial.

The graduates have included people from Africa, Cuba, Jamaica, Puerto Rico and other places as well as the United States.

Research conducted at Tuskegee, especially by botanist George Washington Carver, helped poor Southern farmers.

At the very least they did not have to protect an institution – Tuskegee – for which he had the primary, if not sole, responsibility.”Until Louis R.

Harlan’s authoritative biography, the first volume of which appeared in 1972, few people were aware that Washington fought racial segregation behind the scenes.

“The matter of having meals at regular hours, of eating on a tablecloth, using a napkin, the use of the bathtub and of the toothbrush, as well as the use of sheets upon the bed, were all new to me.” Washington was introduced to public speaking.

A teacher gave him private lessons in breathing, emphasis and articulation.

He was inspired by the sight of a black man reading a newspaper to a crowd. Washington began attending Sunday school at the African Baptist Church, and there he learned from William Davis, an 18-year-old Ohio boy living with the pastor.

A school opened in nearby Tinkerville, and Washington attended while working at the salt furnaces. After about a year and a half, Washington set out for a school he had heard about — Hampton Normal and Agricultural Institute in Hampton, Virginia — where poor blacks could pay their expenses by working on campus. Washington rode part of the distance on a train, then boarded a stagecoach until he had no more money.

He expressed a long-term view: “Brains, property, and character for the Negro will settle the question of civil rights.”Washington insisted that teaching moral behavior and competence was the best bet to promote racial harmony. The more things blacks produced which whites need, the more whites were likely to abandon their racial stereotypes and show respect.

Improving racial relations required changing human hearts, which couldn’t be done by passing laws.

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